Global Investigative Journalism Conference 2021

GIJC21 heads to Sydney – 3 to 7 November 2021

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The iconic Opera House in Sydney Harbor, at the center of a bustling, diverse metropolis of five million people. Credit: Tourism Australia via Internet GIJC
The iconic Opera House in Sydney Harbor, at the center of a bustling, diverse metropolis of five million people. Credit: Tourism Australia via Internet GIJC

The Global Conference, held every two years, is the seminal international event in investigative journalism. GIJC21 is scheduled to be held from 3 to 7 November 2021 at the International Convention Center in central Sydney. The GIJN staff reports that the Global Investigative Journalism Network and the Judith Neilson Institute for Journalism and Ideas will co-host the 12th Global Investigative Journalism Conference, in Sydney, Australia, during November 2021.

The Global Investigative Journalism Network, founded in 2003, is an association of 184 nonprofit organizations in 77 countries, working to strengthen investigative reporting worldwide. In South Asia, there are nine member organizations in Bhutan, India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan. 

The Sydney-based Judith Neilson Institute was founded in 2018 to support quality journalism in Australia and around the world. GIJC21 will be developed as an Asia Pacific event. It is the first time that the Global Conference will be held in the Asia Pacific region, home to 60 percent of the world’s population. 

“We deeply appreciate the Judith Neilson Institute’s support during these uncertain times,” said Brant Houston, chair of the GIJN board. “This presents GIJN with a great opportunity to hold its first global conference in the region.”

The Executive Director of JNI, Mark Ryan, said GIJC21 would be an unparalleled opportunity for journalists from Australia and the Asia Pacific to learn techniques and skills from the best journalists in the world. “It will also showcase the work of journalists from Australia and the Asia Pacific and share their lessons and experiences with the global journalism community,” he said.

The GIJCs are huge training events, featuring practical panels and workshops on the latest investigative techniques, data analysis, online research, cross-border collaboration, and more by the best journalists in the field. The conferences have trained over 8,000 journalists and resulted in the founding of investigative teams, nonprofit newsrooms, and headline-making stories around the world. The last conference, GIJC19, was held in Hamburg, Germany, in September 2019, and attracted 1,750 people from 131 countries.

Next year’s conference will again feature a robust fellowship program that brings in journalists from developing and transitioning countries to receive training. For the latest info on registration and the program, be sure to follow on Twitter (@gijn and @JN_Institute) and subscribe to the GIJN Bulletin. Those interested in becoming a GIJC21 donor or co-sponsor can please contact hello@gijn.org.

2023 promises an interesting ride for print in India

Indian Printer and Publisher founded in 1979 is the oldest B2B trade publication in the multi-platform and multi-channel IPPGroup. While the print and packaging industries have been resilient in the past 33 months since the pandemic lockdown of 25 March 2020, the commercial printing and newspaper industries have yet to recover their pre-Covid trajectory.

The fragmented commercial printing industry faces substantial challenges as does the newspaper industry. While digital short-run printing and the signage industry seem to be recovering a bit faster, ultimately their growth will also be moderated by the progress of the overall economy. On the other hand book printing exports are doing well but they too face several supply-chain and logistics challenges.

The price of publication papers including newsprint has been high in the past year while availability is diminished by several mills shutting down their publication paper and newsprint machines in the past four years. Indian paper mills are also exporting many types of paper and have raised prices for Indian printers. To some extent, this has helped in the recovery of the digital printing industry with its on-demand short-run and low-wastage paradigm.

Ultimately digital print and other digital channels will help print grow in a country where we are still far behind in our paper and print consumption and where digital is a leapfrog technology that will only increase the demand for print in the foreseeable future. For instance, there is no alternative to a rise in textbook consumption but this segment will only reach normality in the next financial year beginning on 1 April 2023.

Thus while the new normal is a moving target and many commercial printers look to diversification, we believe that our target audiences may shift and change. Like them, we will also have to adapt with agility to keep up with their business and technical information needs.

Our 2023 media kit is ready, and it is the right time to take stock and reconnect with your potential markets and customers. Print is the glue for the growth of liberal education, new industry, and an emerging economy. We seek your participation in what promises to be an interesting ride.

– Naresh Khanna

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