International Trade Commission scraps newsprint tariffs

0
86
International Trade Commission
David Chavern, president and chief executive officer, News Media Alliance

The U.S. International Trade Commission has overturned tariffs put on Canadian newsprint by the U.S. Commerce Department, as per reports in Newspapers & Technology (www.newsandtech.com).

All five commissioners voted in the negative that the paper from Canada does not injure U.S. industry, knocking out the anti-dumping and countervailing duties.

“The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) today determined that a U.S. industry is not materially injured or threatened with material injury by reason of imports of uncoated groundwood paper from Canada that the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) has determined are subsidized and sold in the United States at less than fair value,” said a release from the commission. “As a result of the USITC’s negative determinations, no antidumping or countervailing duty orders will be issued on imports of this product from Canada.”

Newspapers and industry trade groups had lobbied hard against the tariffs, imposed earlier this year.

Stop Tariffs on Printers & Publishers (STOPP), a coalition of printers, publishers, retailers, paper suppliers and distributors, welcomed the decision.

“Today is a great day for American journalism. The ITC’s decision will help to preserve the vitality of local newspapers and prevent additional job losses in the printing and publishing sectors,” said David Chavern, president and chief executive officer, News Media Alliance, part of the coalition. “The end of these unwarranted tariffs means local newspapers can focus once again on playing a vital role in our democracy by keeping citizens informed and connected to the daily life of their communities.”

The Commerce Department imposed the duties on uncoated groundwood paper made in Canada in response to a petition filed by North Pacific Paper Company (NORPAC), a paper mill in Longview, Washington.