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Netherland’s SPGPrints expands capacity 

New digital ink production facility added 

Posted on Thursday, 13 July 2017. Posted in Digital Print . Written by IPP Desk

New digital ink production facility added 

Netherland-based SPGPrints has strengthened its commitment to the textile printing industry by doubling the size of its digital ink production facility at its Boxmeer headquarters for the second time in two years. Scheduled to open in the final quarter of 2017, the expanded 1000 square meter production facility is part of an EUR 8 million capital investment program. This will also include the building of the new Experience Center, dedicated to driving innovation in digital textile printing.
The company manufactures reactive, acid, disperse and sublimation inks for use with digital inkjet printers, covering the full range of textile applications.

The expanded facility is in close proximity to both SPGPrints’ research and development laboratories, and the corporate headquarters so that communication chains are short and decisions can be made quickly.

The investment in the ink plant expansion is another step towards SPGPrints’ goal of making digital the mainstream printing technology for textile applications.

SPGPrints’ subsidiary company, Veco B.V., of Eerbeek, Netherlands, develops precision metal parts for a wide range of markets, including the design and production of nozzle plates for inkjet print heads. The synergy enabled by the relationships with the major suppliers for print heads in the textile market means that inks and print heads can be designed to work optimally, and deliver the best technologies to the customer.

Jos Notermans, commercial manager of digital textiles at SPGPrints said, “The increase in the volume of our ink production means that we will continue to be able to serve the expanding digital textile printing market that we have helped to build over the last three decades.

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